Smart Women- First Book Review of 2019

Good Morning!

I finished my first book of 2019 on Saturday, and I wanted to go ahead and write this while it was fresh on my mind.

Smart Women by Judy Blume was different from the only other adult appropriate book I have read by Judy Blume. Until I read, In the Unlikely Event (which I reviewed on here a while back), I only ever thought about Judy Blume being an other for children and pre-teens. I loved her books when I was little, so I was thrilled to learn she also writes books for adults.

Smart Women was definitely not a child’s book to put it mildly. It’s set in the early 1980s. There’s a lot of sex. At some times, I even thought it was a bit much. The book needs it though, because it is an integral part in how the characters progress.

There are several main characters, and each chapter comes from the perspective of a different person. The two main characters are Margo and B.B. They both are divorced and relocated to Colorado to start over. Their mutual friend Claire (on the verge of divorce throughout the whole book) is their mutual connection, but otherwise there isn’t much of a friendship between the two. B.B. (formerly Francine) has one living child, a preteen named Sara, and Margo has two teenagers Stuart and Michelle.

B.B. is a high-strung, type A personality who thinks everything is going perfect until her ex-husband moves to town and tosses her perfect world up in the air. B.B.’s world is not perfect, it hasn’t been; she is just good at pushing all of her emotions and the memory of her deceased son to the back of her mind. I mean, B.B. isn’t even her real name- that’s how far she’s gone to create a new life. In the end, it backfires on her and she ends up in a mental institution getting the help she desparately needs.

Margo is a loveable mess. She just wants to love and be loved, and she finds that in B.B.’s ex-husband Andrew. It is definitely a factor in B.B.’s eventual breakdown, but it certainly isn’t the reason. The two fall in love pretty quickly, and throughout the whole book I switched from being happy for her and sad for B.B.

The details aren’t as important as the theme of the book though, which is that in the end, a smart woman always knows what is good for her. The book revolves around love, divorce, and change. In the end, B.B. gets the help she needs, and Margo gets the love she deserves. Even the teenage girls go through lessons that require them to grow up sooner than necessary.

All in all, I thought it was a good book. I probably wouldn’t have read it if Judy Blume had not written it though. I don’t typically enjoy cheesy love stories, and while this had a lot of other themes, the main one was love and doing whatever was necessary to hold onto it. I think it felt a little cheesy because of when it was written more than anything, but even though it’s from the 1980s I think most women can still relate to the characters in the book.

I would recommend this if you’re looking for an easy read. It’s a fun book to relax with, and I’m glad I found it on the back of a shelf at my parent’s house.

Author: Julie Beeks

Attorney Writer Bookstagrammer Serial killer enthusiast

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s